All posts filed under: Interviews

Indenture

British imperial indenture system a ‘sanitised’ form of slavery

The abolition of slavery was the catalyst for the system of indenture, under which the British brought Chinese and East Indians to the Caribbean to labour on the region’s sugar plantations. The first wave arrived in Mauritius in 1834, followed by Guyana (1838) and Trinidad (1845). By the time the system, which also operated in […]

Godzilla on my mind

Dr Iain smith, a film studies lecturer at King’s College London and one of ten academics selected by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council as a New Generation Thinker, explains how his late night viewings of old Godzilla films reinforced his desire to work in the arts. Share this article:

Kepler’s Trial: out of many disciplines, one opera

Kepler’s Trial, an opera based on The Astronomer and the Witch by Professor Ulinka Rublack, tells the extraordinary story of Katharina Kepler (1546–1622), whose celebrated astronomer son, Johannes, defended her against accusations of witchcraft. It is the culmination of a highly unusual creative process, in which a team of leading scholars met regularly to explore […]

David Dabydeen: a series like ‘Roots’ would help the British public understand indentureship

Begun in 1834 and abolished in 1917, the system of indenture created Indian diasporic communities in three continents. Professor David Dabydeen, a pioneer of Indian-Caribbean studies as a discipline in the UK and a leading poet of the Indian-Caribbean experience, is co-convenor of the forthcoming Indenture Abolition Centenary conference. Below, he explains why it is […]

Kane from Canada

Jane Roberts is a senior research fellow in the School of Advanced Study’s Institute of English Studies (IES) and emeritus professor of English language and medieval literature, University of London. She has recently published Kane from Canada, the memoir of George Kane (1916-2008) edited with his daughter, Mary Kane. Share this article: